react-router-4 0.0.4

Externs for react-router 4

Released 2018-05-19.

To install, run:

haxelib install react-router-4 0.0.4

See using Haxelib in Haxelib documentation for more information.

Maintainerklabz
Websitehttps://github.com/kLabz/haxe-react-router
Current version0.0.4
StatisticsInstalled 61 times
LicenseMIT
Tags

README.md

Haxe react-router 4

A Haxe library offering externs for version 4 of the react-router library. For version 3, see haxe-react-router by elsassph.

Installation

Using haxelib:

haxelib install react-router-4

Usage

An extensive documentation is available here for the javascript react-router library and is mostly applicable for this library too.

React Router API

ReactRouter.matchPath(pathname:String, props:RouteMatchProps):Null<RouterMatch>

This lets you use the same matching code that <Route> uses except outside of the normal render cycle, like gathering up data dependencies before rendering on the server.

See https://reacttraining.com/react-router/web/api/matchPath

ReactRouter.withRouter(component:CreateElementType):CreateElementType

You can get access to the history object’s properties and the closest <Route>'s match via the withRouter higher-order component. withRouter will re-render its component every time the route changes with the same props as <Route> render props: { match, location, history }.

See https://reacttraining.com/react-router/web/api/withRouter

With haxe-react version 1.4.1+ (not released at the moment, but this is available by using the git version), you can use @:wrap to easily wrap your component with a withRouter call:

@:wrap(react.router.ReactRouter.withRouter)
class MyComponent extends ReactComponentOfProps<Props> {
}

React Router components

React Router components are available in the react.router package.

Each component has its typed props with comments and a link to the javascript react-router documentation, which applies to this library.

List of available components:

Code splitting with haxe-loader

When using the webpack haxe-loader library, you can use react.router.bundle.Bundle.load(...) to split your application into bundles directly in your routes:

import react.ReactMacro.jsx;
import react.router.BrowserRouter;
import react.router.Route;
import react.router.Switch;
import react.router.bundle.Bundle;

class MainRouter extends ReactComponent {
    override public function render() {
        return jsx('
            <$BrowserRouter>
                <$Switch>
                    <!-- Using default loader component (`<div className="loader" />`) -->
                    <!-- and default error component (`<div className="error" />`) -->
                    <$Route
                        path="/bundle1"
                        component=${Bundle.load(first.FirstBundle)}
                    />

                    <!-- Using custom loader and/or error component -->
                    <!-- The error component will get an `error` prop with the load error as `Dynamic` -->
                    <$Route
                        path="/bundle2"
                        component=${Bundle.load(second.SecondBundle, CustomLoader, CustomError)}
                    />
                </$Switch>
            </$BrowserRouter>
        ');
    }
}

Usage with @:jsxStatic components

You cannot directly load @:jsxStatic components (see the @:jsxStatic original PR on haxe-react) with current (1.4.0) haxe-react version.

There is an ongoing PR to make it work, which may end up being extracted as a standalone haxelib to avoid additional load on haxe-react.

If you really need to, another workaround is to use a wrapper around your @:jsxStatic component:


// In your router
jsx('
    <!-- ... -->
    <$Route path="/bundle3" component=${Bundle.load(MyWrapper)} />
');

// In your bundle's module
class MyWrapper extends ReactComponent {
    override public function render() {
        return jsx('
            <$MyComponent {...props} />
        ');
    }
}

@:jsxStatic('render')
class MyComponent {
    public static function render(props:Dynamic) {
        return jsx('<div>My component</div>');
    }
}

Bundle initialization code

You may want to execute some code when your bundle is first loaded.

When your component is loaded via Bundle.load(...) (or ILazyLoad, see below), you can define initialization code to be executed at first load by creating an onLoad static method on your component:

import react.ReactComponent;
import react.router.Route.RouteRenderProps;

@:expose('default')
class MyBundle extends ReactComponentOfProps<RouteRenderProps> {
    // If you want to execute code when this bundle is _first_ loaded:
    public static function onLoad() {
        // ...
    }

    // ...
}

ILazyLoad macro (experimental)

If you use custom loaders and/or custom error components, Bundle.load() calls can become quite verbose.

There is an experimental API based on macros to define your async routes like this:

import react.ReactMacro.jsx;
import react.router.BrowserRouter;
import react.router.Route;
import react.router.Switch;
import react.router.bundle.ILazyLoad;

// Magic interface with build macro
// To easily create component bundles
class LazyLoad implements ILazyLoad<[
    my.first.app.FirstApp,
    my.second.app.SecondApp,
    my.third.app.ThirdApp
]> {
    // A build macro will create 3 static functions:
    // - FirstApp, which will render my.first.app.FirstApp
    // - SecondApp, which will render my.second.app.SecondApp
    // - ThirdApp, which will render my.third.app.ThirdApp

    // Warning: due to this notation, you cannot lazy load two components with
    // the same name from two different packages.


    // You can also define a loader component, if you want
    // If you don't, a <div className="loader"></div> will be rendered instead.
    static var loading = my.components.Loader;

    // Same thing for the error component.
    // Both loaderComponent and errorComponent can be either a static var or a
    // static function.
    // The error component will receive an `error` prop with the load error.
    // If you don't provide any, a <div className="error"></div> will be
    // rendered if the require fails.
    static function error() {
        return jsx('<div className="error">Error!</div>');
    }
}

You can then use them in your react-router routes:

class MyRouter extends ReactComponent {
    override public function render() {
        return jsx('
            <$BrowserRouter>
                <$Switch>
                    <$Route path="/first" component=${LazyLoad.FirstApp} />
                    <$Route path="/second" component=${LazyLoad.SecondApp} />
                    <$Route path="/third" component=${LazyLoad.ThirdApp} />
                </$Switch>
            </$BrowserRouter>
        ');
    }
}